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OverviewV-Play 2 Support (Qt 5) › BalloonPop tutorial not up to date

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  • #15502

    Isak

    Hello,

     

    I have been starting to learn V-Play and i love it. However i dont love when the tutorials dont cover everything. For example in BalloonPop where is code in the sourcecode example how to make the game start after the splashscreen but i cant find anything about this in the tutorial? And as a beginner who dont have the indie license yet this is a must to correctly see the result of the game. Wouldnt it be best to just have it built in so that the code dont start to execute until the splashscreen is finished? That way you dont need to think of having this in the tutorials.

    I have learnt alot from this but it was close for me to give up on V-Play and i am thinking that this can be very confusing for new V-Play users. You create a box, and turn on some gravity and when they run that game they see no box because of that it has already fell out of the screen because of that the code starts running while the splashscreen runs.

    #15503

    Günther
    V-Play Team

    Hi Isak!

    You’re right, working with the splash screen can be a bit confusing. And of course the tutorials should work out-of-the box – we’ll correct that!

    Chris also already replied to your email about this, but let me summarize the main points how the splash and the signal works also here in the forums for everybody:

    V-Play does not affect the way how Qt (the basic platform beneath V-Play) creates the UI Items and executes application code. In general, the official signal for code that should run after an item is fully created is Component.onCompleted, so using this is signal is recommended for initialization code of any custom item.

    The Splash Screen is additionally added by V-Play as an overlay above the actual GameWindow or App content.
    This has the disadvantage, that Component.onCompleted cannot be used in certain cases (like in the tutorial), as the code is actually run while the splash is still visible and you see a scene after the splash where already a few seconds passed in the scene. To solve this, we provide the onSplashScreenFinished signal which can then be used instead.

    The advantage of having a Splash Screen like this, is that the Splash Screen now also acts as a loading screen because the game scene is already created behind the splash.  In addition, there’s often not really a need to use the splashScreenFinished signal in a real game. Component.onCompleted can safely be used when the first screen is a simple game menu or maybe a custom Loading Scene. In addition, indie and enterprise users do not even see a splash screen at all and do not require the signal therefore.

    Best,
    Günther

    #15504

    Isak

    GT said:

    Hi Isak!

    You’re right, working with the splash screen can be a bit confusing. And of course the tutorials should work out-of-the box – we’ll correct that!

    Chris also already replied to your email about this, but let me summarize the main points how the splash and the signal works also here in the forums for everybody:

    V-Play does not affect the way how Qt (the basic platform beneath V-Play) creates the UI Items and executes application code. In general, the official signal for code that should run after an item is fully created is Component.onCompleted, so using this is signal is recommended for initialization code of any custom item.

    The Splash Screen is additionally added by V-Play as an overlay above the actual GameWindow or App content.
    This has the disadvantage, that Component.onCompleted cannot be used in certain cases (like in the tutorial), as the code is actually run while the splash is still visible and you see a scene after the splash where already a few seconds passed in the scene. To solve this, we provide the onSplashScreenFinished signal which can then be used instead.

    The advantage of having a Splash Screen like this, is that the Splash Screen now also acts as a loading screen because the game scene is already created behind the splash.  In addition, there’s often not really a need to use the splashScreenFinished signal in a real game. Component.onCompleted can safely be used when the first screen is a simple game menu or maybe a custom Loading Scene. In addition, indie and enterprise users do not even see a splash screen at all and do not require the signal therefore.

    Best,
    Günther

    Hello Günther,

     

    Yes, i saw that Chris had answered me=)

    I didn’t think of that advantage, i got animations in my menu so wanted it to run after the splashscreen but guess i can just let the animation run after the splashscreen and load everything else during the splashscreen.

    Thanks for the summarization :)

     

    /Isak

     

     

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